What roof style is best for your Kansas City area porch? Gable? Shed? Flat? Hip?

If you’re considering adding a screened porch to your Kansas City area home, you no doubt have a visualization of where on your home you would like your new porch and the general shape and size of your porch. You may have a sense of whether you want a small or large porch, whether you want a vaulted ceiling, and what exterior finish you prefer. Almost without exception, when Kansas City area residents initially call us, they are looking for a room that provides a lot of light. Ceiling style, among other factors, plays a role in the amount of light a new room will receive. Another very common request we receive is for a vaulted ceiling which comes from a gable roof style. Because roof style is such a popular question, we’d like to share some information about each below to help you begin to envision a porch addition to your home. There may be some factors that limit your options which we will also describe below.

The starting point

What roof style or styles do you already have on your home? Do you have a gable roof, multiple gables, a shed roof or a combination of shed and gable roof lines on your existing home? When we add a porch addition to a home, our goal is to make the porch look original to your home. Your home likely has a couple roof lines. Your new porch should either match or complement those roof lines in order to look original to your home.

What is the layout of the back of your home? Is your home one story or two stories? If two stories, what is the configuration of the second story? Is the second story lined with windows? If so, this will significant limit your options as a porch generally should neither cover nor block the view of the existing second-story windows. Let’s look at each of the roof styles.

Gable roof screened porch

A gable roof is the triangular roof style. It can have different pitches and can be oriented in different directions. By far, the gable roof is the most requested. The triangular shape of the roof is very pleasing to the eye and it creates a vaulted ceiling within the room. The gable end or ends can be left open (screened) to allow even more lighting into your porch.

The porch below has an open gable allowing a great deal of visibility from the porch and creating a very light and airy space.

Depending on the orientation of the gable, some porches will have a closed gable on the house wall and an open gable on the exterior site.

Shed roof screened porch

If your home has a number of second story windows or other second story architectural elements limiting your options for a vaulted ceiling, a shed roof may be a great option. A shed roof slopes downward from the house wall. The degree of the slope depends on a few factors but is limited by any obstructions on the second story of the home. While some people fear a shed roof will not provide enough light, the exterior sides can be left open allowing more light into your space. In addition, there may be opportunities to extend the height of the roof to allow more lighting into the room.

Flat roof screened porch

There are a number of reasons why a flat roof is the best roof style. As you read above, the second story configuration may require it. But, you may want a second story structure on your porch. You may want an open porch on the first level and a screened porch on the second level. As mentioned with a shed roof, one way to bring more light into the space is elevating the roof which may be possible depending on the back-of-home layout. One common question we receive about flat roofs is whether or not they drain. Flat roofs are not completely flat. They are slightly pitched to ensure proper draining and normally require special roof material.

Hybrid porch roof style

At Archadeck of Kansas City, one roof style is fairly popular. This style includes a combination shed/gable. On the exterior side of a shed roof, an option is to add a small gable for visual interest. If you are engaging a professional contractor to build your porch, you may want the custom look presented with a unique design solution.

The gable on the roof below does a great job of complimenting the gable roof lines of this home.

A combination roof style provides a good amount of visual interest to the inside of your porch.

Hip roof screened porch

A hip roof slopes down in 4 or more directions from a high point on the roof. This may be a good option if you have hip roof lines on your home.

It’s important to work with an experienced custom builder. This builder will be able to provide the options as well as the benefits and drawbacks for each. Give us a call for a free consultation for your Kansas City area porch. Call (913) 851-3325.

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